All posts filed under: Socialization

The Math Problem

The Math Problem

The Problem Despite homeschool studies’ *ahem* diverse sampling methods and questionable validity, one trend has nonetheless emerged: compared to their regularly-schooled peers, homeschool students are weaker in math. The Coalition for Responsible Home Education has a brilliant article on this, complete with citations and graphs (check it out!). Why is this the case? Potential Variables In short: more research is needed. Studies’ sampling methods, ease of humanities vs. STEM education, cultural focus on humanities over STEM, resource access, resource use, and more initial homeschooler interest in humanities vs. mathematics all potentially contribute to homeschoolers’ limited math skills. It is also notoriously difficult to learn and teach. These limitations, echoed in America’s 38th place in mathematics, expand when math-adverse parents are tasked with teaching their student concepts they themselves don’t understand. And, unlike their regularly-schooled peers, homeschoolers have the unique opportunity to avoid mathematics in favor of other subjects. This likely influences the disparity; the most math-adverse public school student would be exposed to mathematical concepts 5 days a week for nearly a decade, the most …

Do we have (real) lives?

Do we have (real) lives?

You continually hear that school is said to combat isolation, provide socialization, and connections. It was always the third question my sister and I were asked— “What about socialization?” Or some other equally awkwardly worded question of whether or not we had friends. And it got us wondering: do we have (real) lives? Do any of us? You don’t have to be homeschooled to be isolated. There are an unfortunate number of publicly-schooled shooters and an equally nauseating number of isolated, normally-schooled children who have taken their own lives. In fact, a desire to remove your children from this isolating atmosphere is a frequently cited factor in parents’ choice to homeschool (source). Given the innately paradoxical schooling structure, the state-mandated 6-8 hours of mandatory peer-to-peer contact sometimes seems a schools’ primary—if not only—benefit. After all, aren’t your friends some of your best memories of school? Aren’t homeschoolers missing out? What do the statistics actually say? Is it scientifically advisable to abate your socialization concerns by dropping your children off on a veritable concrete island? Is …